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Life In Legacy - Week ending Saturday, February 25, 2017

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Charles L. Bartlett, Pulitzer-winning journalist who introduced JFK to JackieBrenda Buttner, host of Fox News Channel’s 'Bulls & Bears'Gary Cartwright, Texas sportswriterLucas Chellew, CHP officerVitaly Churkin, Russian ambassador to UNAlan Colmes, liberal commentator on Fox NewsDesmond, Cardinal Connell, former archbishop of Dublin, IrelandLarry Coryell, jazz fusion guitaristFrank Delaney, Irish-born author and broadcasterEni H. Faleomavaega, American Samoa’s longest-serving delegate to the US HouseKaci Kullmann Five, head of Norwegian Nobel CommitteeJamie Fox, New Jersey officialKarla Gray, first female chief justice of Montana Supreme CourtSteve Hewlett, British radio and print journalistSofia Imber, Venezuelan journaistFritz Koenig, German sculptor of 9/11 memorialHalaevalu Mata'aho, queen mother of TongaDr. Sabine Oberhauser, Austrian health ministerMartha Gilmore Parfet, granddaughter of Upjohn Co. founderCharismatic, racehorse who nearly won Triple Crown in 1999Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, music director of Minnesota Orchestra

Art and Literature

Frank Delaney (74) Irish-born author and broadcaster who, like most novices, initially dismissed James Joyce‘s Ulysses as unreadable but later spent his career making that novel about ordinary people accessible to ordinary readers. Delaney was also a literary impresario and interpreter who interviewed hundreds of fellow authors and was often solicited to judge book awards, including the Man Booker Prize. His podcasts on Ulysses have been downloaded more than 2.5 million times. Delaney died in Danbury, Connecticut, where he was being treated for a stroke he had suffered a day earlier, on February 21, 2017.

Fritz Koenig (92) German sculptor whose work The Sphere became a symbol of resilience after the 9/11 attacks in New York. A well-known artist thanks to his large statues and sculptures, Koenig created the ball-shaped bronze over a four-year period starting in 1967. Originally called Grosse Kugelkaryatide NY, the 25-foot-high sculpture stood at the foot of the World Trade Center from 1971 until September 11, 2001, when al-Qaida hijackers flew airliners into the twin towers. It was recovered from the rubble—heavily dented but structurally intact—and was moved to Battery Park, where it now stands alongside an eternal flame dedicated to the people who died that day. Koenig died in Altdorf, Germany, about 31 miles northeast of Munich, on February 22, 2017.


Business and Science

Martha Gilmore Parfet (91) last surviving granddaughter of the founder of the Upjohn Co. Parfet's grandfather was W. E. Upjohn, founder of a Kalamazoo (Mich.) drug company that carried his name. It merged with another company in 1995 and now is part of Pfizer. For 20 years Parfet ran the family department store, Gilmore Brothers. She was a trustee at the Kalamazoo Community Foundation and the first woman to lead the board. Upjohn's $1,000 donation created the foundation in 1925. Parfet died in Hickory Corners, in southwestern Michigan, on February 20, 2017.


Law

Lucas Chellew (31) seven-year veteran of the California Highway Patrol who followed his father’s footsteps into the CHP. Chellew graduated from the CHP Academy in West Sacramento in May 2009 and was assigned to the South Sacramento Area office. His father, Charles Chellew, is a retired CHP captain, and his sister, Hanna Chellew, is a CHP officer. Lucas Chellew was chasing a suspect on a motorcycle in South Sacramento when a collision occurred and he lost control of his motorcycle. He was transported to the University of California/Davis Medical Center, where he later died on February 22, 2017.

Karla Gray (69) first female chief justice of the Montana Supreme Court. While Gray was chief justice, Montana’s judicial system was restructured with control of the district courts moving from counties to a branch under the Supreme Court. She told Lee Newspapers of Montana in 2008 that the change made the courts run more efficiently and created greater opportunities for judges and others to receive statewide training. She also spearheaded an effort to fast-track state Supreme Court cases involving child custody, especially when both parents were losing custody. Gray died of cancer in Helena, Montana on February 19, 2017.


News and Entertainment

Charles L. Bartlett (95) Washington newspaper correspondent and columnist who won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting but was especially remembered for introducing John F. Kennedy to Jacqueline Bouvier. Bartlett was a Washington reporter for the Chattanooga Times and a syndicated columnist in Washington for the Chicago Sun-Times. He later published a newsletter on the political scene for private clients in a journalism career that spanned some 65 years. While with the Chattanooga Times, Bartlett won a Pulitzer in 1956 for articles leading to a Senate subcommittee investigation into conflict of interest issues involving Harold E. Talbott, secretary of the US Air Force in President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s administration. The inquiry resulted in Talbott’s resignation in August 1955. Bartlett died in Washington, DC on February 19, 2017.

Brenda Buttner (55) host of Fox News Channel’s Bulls & Bears. Buttner was CNBC’s Washington correspondent and hosted the network’s The Money Club before joining Fox News in 2000. She graduated from Harvard University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University in England. She died of cancer in Ridgewood, New Jersey on February 20, 2017.

Alan Colmes (66) radio and TV host and commentator best known as the liberal foil to hard-right Sean Hannity on the Fox News Channel. In 1996 Colmes and Hannity began a 12-year run as cohosts of the Hannity & Colmes program, which brought Colmes both fame and ridicule. A minority voice on the conservative channel, he was often mocked as too nice and overshadowed by the ever-aggressive Hannity. Liberal media watchdog Fairness & Accuracy in Media likened him to the Washington Generals, dependable losers to basketball’s Harlem Globetrotters. Colmes continued to appear as a commentator on Fox after his show with Hannity ended. Married to Jocelyn Elise Crowley, sister of longtime Fox contributor Monica Crowley, he died of lymphoma in New York City on February 23, 2017.

Larry Coryell (73) jazz guitarist known as the “Godfather of Fusion.” Coryell grew up in the Seattle area. After taking up the guitar, he moved to New York in 1965. His eclectic career includes collaborations with many jazz greats, including Miles Davis, Gary Burton, Alphonse Mouzon, and Chet Baker. Coryell’s works often mixed jazz, classical, and rock ingredients. In 1969 he recorded Spaces, his most noted album. Many say it sparked the emergence of the jazz fusion movement. Coryell had just performed two shows at the Iridium on February 17–18. He died the next day in New York City on February 19, 2017.

Steve Hewlett (58) British journalist who described his battle with cancer in dispatches heard by millions of radio listeners. A longtime editor, producer, and broadcaster for the British Broadcasting Co. (BBC), Hewlett was diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus in March 2016. He described his diagnosis and treatment in regular slots on BBC radio's PM program and in a newspaper column. After being told he had only weeks to live, Hewlett recently married his partner, Rachel, in a hospital ceremony. He died in London, England on February 20, 2017.

Sofia Imber (92) one of Venezuela’s most influential women journalists who turned a garage into the Caracas Museum of Contemporary Art. Imber’s TV program Buenos Dias, which she hosted with her second husband, Carlos Rangel, from 1969–93, was a landmark of Venezuelan journalism and politics. Imber became famous for her cutting interviews with global leaders such as former US President Jimmy Carter, Israel’s Simon Peres, and the Dalai Lama and writers like Gabriel Garcia Marquez. She died from complications of old age in Caracas, Venezuela on February 20, 2017.

Stanislaw Skrowaczewski (93) former longtime Minnesota Orchestra music director who conducted major orchestras in England, Japan, and other countries. Skrowaczewski’s last concerts were with the Minnesota Orchestra in October 2016, conducting works by Anton Bruckner, his specialty. He led the Minnesota Orchestra for 19 years, starting in 1960, but served on its artistic staff for 56 years. During his tenure as music director, he was instrumental in the creation of Orchestra Hall, the orchestra’s home in downtown Minneapolis that opened in 1974. Skrowaczewski also was a champion of new music and a composer. He suffered a stroke in November 2016, which forced him to cancel upcoming appearances with the Dallas Symphony and other orchestras. He died at a suburban Minneapolis, Minnesota hospital after suffering a second stroke earlier in the month, on February 21, 2017.


Politics and Military

Vitaly Churkin (64) Russia's ambassador to the United Nations, a veteran diplomat known as a powerful voice for his country's interests as he sparred with his Western counterparts. Churkin had been Russia's envoy at the UN since 2006 and was considered Moscow's great champion there. He died suddenly after falling ill at his office in New York City on February 20, 2017.

Eni H. Faleomavaega (73) American Samoa’s longest-serving nonvoting delegate to the US House of Representatives. The House delegate from American Samoa, a US territory about 2,300 miles south of Hawaii, can vote in committee but not on the House floor. A Democrat, Faleomavaega became a congressional delegate in 1989 and held the position for 13 consecutive terms. Unseated in 2014 by Republican Aumua Amata Radewagen, he died in Provo, Utah on February 22, 2017.

Kaci Kullmann Five (65) head of the Norwegian Nobel Committee. Five had been a member of the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize-awarding committee since 2003. She was elected chairwoman of the committee in 2015 and announced the winner of the 2016 prize in October—Colombian President Juan Manuel Santo—but was unable to attend the December ceremony owing to illness. Five was also known as a political pioneer who provided an important role model for many women. She died in Oslo, Norway after being treated for a recurrence of cancer, on February 19, 2017.

Jamie Fox (62) longtime New Jersey official accused of conspiracy in a shakedown involving the former chairman of the agency that controls New York City-area airports. Fox was a Democrat and held numerous governmental posts during his career. He was transportation commissioner in the administrations of Democrat Gov. Jim McGreevey and Republican Gov. Chris Christie. Fox was serving as a lobbyist for Chicago-based United Airlines when federal prosecutors said he helped then-Port Authority of New York & New Jersey chairman David Samson to establish a regular flight to Samson's vacation home in South Carolina. Samson pleaded guilty to bribery; Fox had vowed to fight the allegations. He died in Lambertville, New Jersey on February 20, 2017.

Halaevalu Mata'aho (90) queen mother of the South Pacific island kingdom of Tonga who dedicated her time to helping the elderly and those with disabilities. Mata’aho was the mother of two kings: George Tupou V, who died in 2012, and the current monarch, King Tupou VI. She died in Auckland, New Zealand after traveling there for health reasons, on February 19, 2017.

Dr. Sabine Oberhauser (53) Austria’s health minister. Oberhauser took office in 2014 after holding various posts for the Social Democrats, senior partners in Austria’s coalition government. She had been battling cancer for two years and relinquished her government duties a week ago to enter the hospital. She died in Vienna, Austria on February 23, 2017.


Society and Religion

Desmond, Cardinal Connell (90) Roman Catholic archbishop of Dublin, Ireland whose tenure was dominated by revelations of pedophilia in the priesthood. Connell oversaw the archdiocese from 1988–2004 and was elevated to cardinal in 2001. He spent 35 years as a University College Dublin theologian before his appointment and said in 2002 that the child abuse scandals then sweeping through the Catholic Church in Ireland had devastated his time in office. State-funded investigations of the church’s efforts to conceal child abuse within its ranks found that Connell typically shielded priests from possible criminal investigations and faulted him for trying to keep the archdiocese’s own records on abuse cases secret. He died in his sleep in Dublin, Ireland February 21, 2017.

Desmond, Cardinal Connell (90) Roman Catholic archbishop of Dublin, Ireland whose tenure was dominated by revelations of pedophilia in the priesthood. Connell oversaw the archdiocese from 1988–2004 and was elevated to cardinal in 2001. He spent 35 years as a University College Dublin theologian before his appointment and said in 2002 that the child abuse scandals then sweeping through the Catholic Church in Ireland had devastated his time in office. State-funded investigations of the church’s efforts to conceal child abuse within its ranks found that Connell typically shielded priests from possible criminal investigations and faulted him for trying to keep the archdiocese’s own records on abuse cases secret. He died in his sleep in Dublin, Ireland February 21, 2017.


Sports

Gary Cartwright (82) former north Texas sportswriter whose features and profiles became part of the foundation of Texas Monthly magazine. Cartwright was a young police reporter with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram before moving to the now-defunct Fort Worth Press, where he joined a legendary sports department run by Blackie Sherrod. He later moved to the Dallas Morning News, where he reported on the Don Meredith-era Dallas Cowboys. He launched his magazine career with Harper’s and Sports Illustrated before joining the newly launched Texas Monthly in 1975. Cartwright had fallen in his home on February 10 and remained on the floor for four days before neighbors found him during a welfare check. He had been in hospice care since then and died in Austin, Texas on February 22, 2017.

Charismatic the Racehorse (21) 1999 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner whose bid for the Triple Crown ended with a dramatic leg injury as he neared the finish line in the Belmont Stakes. A late bloomer, Charismatic won the Derby as a long shot, then followed up by winning the Preakness. At the Belmont, he led with an eighth of a mile to go but took a bad step and fractured his left foreleg as Lemon Drop Kid swept by to win; Charismatic finished third. The horse underwent surgery and won Horse of the Year honors. He retired from racing with five wins in 17 starts, with career earnings exceeding $2 million before starting his stud career in 2000. He was found dead in his stall at Old Friends Farm near Georgetown, Kentucky on February 19, 2017.


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